London Irish Old Boys

Welcome to the Sunbury Centre at www.london-irish.co.uk for news and information on London Irish RFC ...

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by tjinkerson on Tue Feb 07, 2006 6:34 pm

dom_pedro wrote:Ed Thrower, Rob Hoadley and of course Paul Sackey went to Wasps.

Mark Mapletoft is at Sarries as Assistant Academy Manager and Chris Sheasby is Head Coach at Staines.

.


Funny how since Tofty started playing for Hertford he gets a name check almost every week in the Rugby Times!
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by PaulHP on Tue Feb 07, 2006 11:03 pm

Cameron Michael Henderson Gidson MBE, now a Senior Partner of Tughans Solicitors. He joined Tughans as a Partner in 1974 and is Head of the Litigation Department.

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He played one match for London Irish against St Mary’s Hospital in February 1966.
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by dom_pedro on Mon Feb 13, 2006 9:45 pm

Sir George Beamish, played for Irish in the 1930s. Was a Group Captain in the RAF during World War II and ended his RAF career as Air Marshal before retiring in 1956. Died in November 1967.

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Cecil Beamish, brother of George also played for Irish in 1930s and went on to captain Ireland. Also a pilot in World War II and went on to become an Air Vice Marshal before retiring in 1974. Died in 1999.

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Both players get a mention in the History of London Irish on the official site.

I tried to chase up Craig Turvey and Nick Drake who both went on to play at Bracknell in 2002, but can't find any recent details.
Last edited by dom_pedro on Fri Jun 16, 2006 9:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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by JonnyC on Tue Feb 14, 2006 12:00 pm

Rob Hardwick, hero of the front row.

Coventry bound?
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by dom_pedro on Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:56 am

Has it been confirmed that Rob has gone to Coventry?

There are more details on some LI Old Boys on the way but some are taking a while to track down (PaulHP and Tony Byrne are on the hunt).
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by tjinkerson on Sat Feb 18, 2006 5:34 pm

Yet again Tofty gets into the Rugby Times! Cambridge beat Hertford 72-19, running 12 tries home against Hertford's 3, but the fact that Totfy scored one of the Hertford tries is considered worthy of a mention! :D
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by dom_pedro on Mon Feb 20, 2006 3:15 pm

According to NoExpert on the Craic, Rob Hardwick has signed a short-term deal with Pertemps Bees. On the Coventry SportNetwork site they confirm it with a quote from Rob ( http://www.sportnetwork.net/boards/read ... 44&sid=425 )

Rob Hardwick wrote:I can understand that this will upset some Cov supporters and ruffle a few feathers. But it's a job to me and I have to make a living. It's purely financial ..... I know supporters are passionate about these things, but I have to do what is best for my family and all my options are open for next season.


and there's a link to a story on icBirmingham too : http://icbirmingham.icnetwork.co.uk/bir ... _page.html

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Rob is pictured in Addleton colours at a testimonial match last year.
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by PaulHP on Sat Feb 25, 2006 12:20 am

Tony Davies
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(Newest picture I can find. Sorry)

Otago Varsity welcomed W. A. Davies at the beginning of 1960, although for most of the season he was on the tour of South Africa with the All Blacks as fullback and utility player, having been nominated from Auckland the previous year. Davies had been captain of Auckland Colts in 1958, in which season he also played for Auckland and North Island Universities. He played in 1959 for Auckland, Barbarians, the Junior All Blacks, and New Zealand Universities, and in 1960 he made the tour of South Africa. On tour he made 15 appearances, including the fourth test as first five eight.

From the 1961 season Davies was the regular Varsity second five-eighth, but in 1961 he was the Otago selectors' choice as fullback, a position in which he played some outstanding games. By 1962 he was appearing for Otago at second five-eighth, and he played twice for New Zealand against the touring Australians in that position. He was again the Otago second five-eighth in 1963, but reverted to the fullback position in 1964, in which season, he scored more than half Otago's total points - 72 out of 126 with 6 tries, 12 penalty goals, and 9 conversions.

A contributor to Critic (Otago University's Student Newspaper) looked back nostalgically on the football played by Davies and his team-mates: "There have been times when University A have persisted with methods so theoretical and technical that they have undermined the most elementary motions of the whole side. It was in the era of W. A. Davies that this was most pronounced. When Davies embarked on one of his Fancy Dan displays he often bewildered his own team more than the opposition. But infuriating though he might have been, Davies was also the architect of some great rugby. His inventive genius had to be admired and respected. On innumerable occasions Davies scored from seemingly impossible positions. What is more, he was responsible for a loyalty among the players. It required more than blackboard theorising to give University the success it had under Davies's management."

Davies played for Otago in 1961-62-63-64, for New Zealand Universities as an Otago representative in 1961-63-64, and for South Island Universities in 1961 and 1963.

Tony Davies also played in England, for Blackheath (1971,72) and London Irish (1972-74), whilst furthering his medical studies. Later he coached club and representative teams in Canberra.

Profile University of Otago RFC.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

FULL NAME
William Anthony Davies

BORN
Saturday, 16 September 1939 in Auckland

AGE
66

PHYSICAL
1.75m, 81kg

POSITION
Fullback and five-eighth

LAST SCHOOL
King's College

RUGBY CLUB
(First made All Blacks from)
Auckland University

PROVINCES
Auckland, Otago

ALL BLACK DEBUT
Saturday, 14 May 1960
v Queensland at Sydney
aged 20 years, 241 days

INTERNATIONAL DEBUT
Saturday, 27 August 1960
v South Africa at Port Elizabeth
aged 20 years, 346 days

LAST TEST
Saturday, 22 September 1962
v Australia at Auckland
aged 23 years, 6 days

ALL BLACK TESTS
3 (0 as Captain)

ALL BLACK GAMES
14 (0 as Captain)

TOTAL ALL BLACK MATCHES
17 (0 as Captain)

ALL BLACK TEST POINTS
0pts

ALL BLACK GAME POINTS
94pts (3t, 20c, 11p, 4dg, 0m)

TOTAL ALL BLACK POINTS
94pts (3t, 20c, 11p, 4dg, 0m)

ALL BLACK NUMBER
608


The All Black Games that Davies played.
(+) = substitute; (-) = replaced



Click on the date to be taken to the Match Card.


1960

14 May vs Queensland at Sydney 32-3

17 May vs Victoria-South Australia at Orange 30-6

21 May vs Western Australia at Perth 57-0

4 Jun vs Griqualand West at Kimberley 21-9

15 Jun vs Western Province Universities at Cape Town 14-3

29 Jun vs A Rhodesian XV at Kitwe 13-9

2 Jul vs Rhodesia at Salisbury 29-14

9 Jul vs Junior Springboks at Durban 20-6

19 Jul vs South-Western Districts at Oudtshoorn 18-6

27 Jul vs Central Universities at East London 21-12

3 Aug vs South African Combined Services at Pretoria 3-8

9 Aug vs Western Transvaal at Potchefstroom 28-3

17 Aug vs North-Eastern Districts at Aliwal North 15-6

27 Aug vs South Africa at Port Elizabeth 3-8

3 Sep vs A Transvaal XV at Johannesburg 9-3

1962

8 Sep vs Australia at Dunedin 3-0

22 Sep vs Australia at Auckland 16-8


Points scored for the All Blacks


t
c
p
dg
pts

vs Queensland, 14 May 1960
1
1
3
1
17

vs Victoria-South Australia, 17 May 1960
-
3
2
-
12

vs Western Australia, 21 May 1960
1
6
1
-
18

vs Griqualand West, 4 Jun 1960
-
3
1
-
9

vs Western Province Universities, 15 Jun 1960
-
1
1
-
5

vs A Rhodesian XV, 29 Jun 1960
-
2
-
-
4

vs Junior Springboks, 9 Jul 1960
-
1
1
-
5

vs South-Western Districts, 19 Jul 1960
-
-
-
1
3

vs Central Universities, 27 Jul 1960
-
3
1
-
9

vs South African Combined Services, 3 Aug 1960
-
-
1
-
3

vs Western Transvaal, 9 Aug 1960
1
-
-
-
3

vs North-Eastern Districts, 17 Aug 1960
-
-
-
1
3

vs A Transvaal XV, 3 Sep 1960
-
-
-
1
3


Totals
3
20
11
4
94



Test Record by Nation


P
W
D
L
t
c
p
dg
pts

Australia
2
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

South Africa
1
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-


Totals
3
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

I presume he's a retired Doctor now!
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by dom_pedro on Sun Feb 26, 2006 9:00 am

list moved to end of thread.
Last edited by dom_pedro on Sun Apr 09, 2006 7:27 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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by dom_pedro on Thu Mar 02, 2006 12:39 pm

Missing from our list is our ex-Chairman and London Irish Old Boy Brendan Mullin (appeared for the club between 1987 and 1989, acclaimed international centre during a Test career that lasted from 1984 to 1995 and included a Lions tour):

I believe Brendan will remain on the board at Irish as a director.

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by dom_pedro on Sat Mar 11, 2006 10:23 pm

Sir David Orr -

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(Sir David is bottom left)

Sir David Orr, Honorary Graduate of the University of Liverpool: Degree of Doctor 1989. Sir David Orr, MC, LLD, The Britain - Nepal Otology Service BRINOS Organisation Patron.
He succeeds the distinguished industrialist, Sir David Orr, who retired on 31 December 1998 after serving as Chancellor of the University since 1992. Tribute to Sir David for his service to the University was paid at a special meeting of the Senate in November. Queen's University Belfast.
Chairman of the British Council 1985 to 1992 Sir David Orr.
Sir David Orr, chairman of Unilever, 1974-82, 83
Patron of the Shakespeare Globe trust 1982 - 1985 Sir David Orr MC
Chairmen of the Armed Forces' Pay Review Body
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by dom_pedro on Mon Mar 27, 2006 2:45 pm

Amazed to see this thread drop off the first page. I've tried to track down Peter Poulos recently but all I can find is that he returned to Samoa. Anyway, here is a list of players that we haven't got details on:

Colin Allen
Ciaran Bird (has been at Esher until around 2004)
Nick Burrows
Michael Corcoran
Rob Gallagher
Nick Harvey (PaulHP has traced Nick from LI to Narbonne to La Rochelle and then to some legal dispute while at Bordeaux-Bègles)
Mat Keenan
Peter Poulos (returned to Samoa?)
Rob Saunders
Jim Staples
Jason Wright (coaching in Italy or NZ? - there is a 3rd/4th team coach at Manawatu called Jason Wright)
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by eek_the_weeble on Mon Mar 27, 2006 3:07 pm

Astonished there's no picture of O'Sheasby


We're also missing notables such as OxonRob and (ahem) the Punch and Judy man :roll:

I'd be interested to know how many other posters were ex-Irish players from across the decades...
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by dom_pedro on Mon Mar 27, 2006 3:16 pm

The majority of Sheasby pics have him in an LI shirt.

Loverat?
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I imagine that some people are being too modest to add themselves to the list.
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by PaulHP on Tue Mar 28, 2006 5:49 pm

Andrew Armstrong Mulligan

Born 4th February 1936 Kasauli, India
Died 24th February 2001 Medford OR, USA

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British & Irish Lion in 1959. Irish International Scrum Half/Captain capped 22 times. Barbarian 20 times (from 1956-62). Cambridge Blue.

Journalist/Broadcaster.

A player and a gentleman

Image

A fair-haired beacon, a lover of life and poetry, with a slightly insouciant air of optimism . . . TONY O'REILLY remembers fellow rugby international, Andrew Mulligan, with whom he shared a deep friendship.

THERE was something different about Andrew Mulligan. Not having played in the trials for the game against France in 1956, I walked into the Louvre Hotel in Paris with its wonderful white marbled interior, to be greeted by the sight of someone I had not met Andrew Mulligan, the new scrumhalf, in a light blue Cambridge blazer, talking to some friends in the vestibule. Paddy Lawler, the gigantic second row from Laois, knew Mulligan from the final trial and said to me, "Jaysus, he's so pale, he makes the white marble look tanned." I shook hands with Mulligan, we eyed each other with the curiosity of two 19-year-olds, and a lifetime of gaiety and friendship was to ensue.

We played on the Saturday at the Stade Colombes, and although beaten 14-8, Andy, in the last ten minutes, contrived a wonderful cross-field run behind his own 22-metre-line which released me on a clear 100-yard path to the line. This, I thought, was a different sort of player and the record book will confirm that of the great Irish scrumhalves of the century Mark Sugden, George Morgan, John O'Meara, Jimmy Kelly, and many others Andy compared with the very best. He had real pace, a lancing break, a superb pass, and was a fine reader of the game.

But most important of all, we shall remember him as a joyful character, a vaudevillian who was most truly and at heart that imprecise thing called "a rugger man." In his student days, he would go anywhere for a rugby match, festival or dinner. He was a troubadour. His motto was, "Have boots, will travel."

He came down from Cambridge after three varsity matches and was confronted with the alarming prospect of a job interview with Thomas De la Rue and Company, the printers. At the end of a searching interview, the chairman said, "You're Irish, aren't you, Mulligan?" which, though detectable from his name, was not from his accent. "What religion are you?" Mulligan replied in the cultured tones perfected by Cambridge University, "What religion had you in mind, sir?"

His natural talents as a communicator and user of language led him into broadcasting. Perhaps his most famous escapade in his new career was when working for Sports Report with Angus Mackay at the BBC. He was asked to do a summary of the Oxford v Cambridge rugby match two years after he came down from university. The match ended at 4:30; his broadcast was at 6:00 at the Shepherds Bush Studio of the BBC.
While descending the stairs, he met Richard Burton. "Hello, Andy," said the great Welshman in his liquid tones. "Do you know Elizabeth?" and introduced Andy to the hypnotic Elizabeth Taylor. The end was inevitable. Andy conducted them with great ceremony to the old Internationals Bar, was mesmerised by the beauty of his companions and the warmth and good humour of Richard Burton, and missed the broadcast at Shepherds Bush by a mile. Not incuriously, that was the end of his career with Sports Report, but in retrospect, what a glorious end.

He subsequently worked for the premier BBC programme, Panorama, and secured a number of major interviews, the first broadcast with the new Prime Minister of Rhodesia, Ian Smith, and a further important ground-breaking interview with the rapidly-rising Anwar Sadat of Egypt.

Switching from the world of television, he became The Observer's correspondent in Paris, working on everything from de Gaulle's prostate to the abduction of Ben Bella in Algeria. In all of this, there was a fizz, a zest, a gaiety and an incredible ability to weave stories out of nothing that marked him as a lucky, a talented and a happy soul. He met the beautiful Pia Schioler, and they were married at Magdalene College in Cambridge on a beautiful day in September. Life seemed almost perfect.

Intermediate to all of this, he had played superbly for the Barbarians on their '57 tour of Canada (a tour on which he commented that "it was the first one in which the players were in charge of the officials"), and for the Barbarians again on their '58 tour of South Africa, where his admiration for a fellow troubadour, Cecil Pedlow, and the unique toughness of Ronnie Kavanagh knew no bounds. Kavanagh would say to him, "Are ye fit, Mulligan?" To which Mulligan would reply, "Yes." "Yes, but are ye hard fit?"

When playing for Wanderers in the Leinster Cup in 1958 with the Kavanagh brothers, they took him for a run up the Dublin Mountains. Somewhat alarmed, I dined with him afterwards and asked him about his experience. "Reilly," he said, "if Lansdowne Road has a rushing river, three mountains and a bog, we will beat you next Saturday. If not, you just might win." In fact, we did.

But his greatest disappointment was to come. He failed to be selected for the 1959 Lions and was heartbroken, as indeed I was, at his omission. But then, after a sojourn in Australia in which we beat Australia in both tests, we flew to New Zealand. Stan Coughtrie, the Scottish scrumhalf who had edged Andrew out of the team, was declared unfit and Andrew was flown out for perhaps the happiest five months of his entire life. The team scored 756 points and was the highest scoring Lions team of the century. The Irish had ten representatives on that tour, the most ever on a 30-man tour, with Syd Millar, Ronnie Dawson, Gordon Wood, Bill Mulcahy, Noel Murphy, Mick English, David Hewitt, Niall Brophy, and now, Andy Mulligan.

There are two photographs which I think capture this odyssey. One is a photograph of both of us playing and singing in the Hi/Diddle/Griddle, an Auckland nightspot, on the Thursday night before the final Test. A New Zealand Herald photographer (now one of our sister papers) took an immortal photograph and captioned it on the front page of the newspaper the next day. It said, "Lions train for final test." Happily we won the final Test to record the first win by a Lions team in New Zealand in 30 years.
It would be fair to say that Andrew Mulligan, with two inspired moments, won the game for us. One, a reverse pass to Risman, which, after a beautiful side step, put Risman in at the corner; and the other, a blind side break which put me over for the last try of the tour. The two photographs above show the try, and the touch judge on the spot is none other than Gordon Wood, the father of the current Irish captain, Keith Wood.

Perhaps the most evocative picture is the one that is central to this tribute, because in a way, it shows what Andrew was all about. On the Sunday after the final test, the team went to Auckland Airport where a crowd of 5,000 were seeing the team off after five months in their country. It was a wonderful experience. We had won the final Test the previous day.

No one in New Zealand begrudged us the victory (though perhaps we should have split the series, having lost the first test 18-17, scoring four tries against six penalties by Don Clarke). The picture shows Mulligan in the control tower with a microphone in hand and a very battered straw hat on his head. He was misdirecting aircraft all over New Zealand, diverting them to Tahiti, Fiji and other ports of call. I suspect that many of those planes may still be in the air, but as he had turned the control tower intercom on publicly, the whole airport was aware of his misdirections, and the entire crowd collapsed with merriment at this foray into utter chaos.

He had a particular gift for mimicry and witty name tags. Robin Roe, the sturdy Irish hooker and an ordained member of the Church of Ireland, was always known by him as Preacher Roe. And on the trip through New Zealand, he and I would record the nocturnal wanderings of our teammates on the night before and recount them on bus or plane the following day.

ONE of his great sketches was of the beloved Lord Wavell Wakefield of Kendall, whom we depicted arriving with the International Rugby Board in New Zealand, and declaiming in a wonderfully, stuffy, brigadier's voice how happy he was to be here. "By the way," he said, inquiring of me as the putative New Zealand reporter, "Where am I?" to which I would reply, "New Zealand, sir." "Yes," he would say with a flourish, "and can I say how amazed and stunned I am to find so many white people here?" Our Maori pals like Albie Prior and Waka Nathan particularly relished this exchange.

He was a brilliant after-dinner speaker, and today, like many others often less talented, he would have made an ample living plying this burgeoning trade. Last year he was nominated as the Captain of all the Captains who had played for Ireland in the past century, to speak on their behalf at the Burlington Hotel. It was a splendid and affectionate speech. In one passage he quotes me as saying to him: "Andy, you look worried." "Why wouldn't I be," he said, "I've just been made captain of the Irish team." He alleges that I replied: "Relax, Andy, sure no one gives a bugger what the captain says." I'd like to think it's apocryphal but there is a certain ring of truth about it. He ended his speech in Latin, showing all the virtues of humour, a classical education and a warm sense of inclusion for his wide and disparate audience.

In his penultimate year, 1960, he captained Ireland in all four matches, following Ronnie Dawson, who had captained the Lions. He was captain of an Irish team that brought the legendary Tom Kiernan into the international limelight. His international rugby career ended in 1961, but his love of rugby football endured to the very end.

After broadcasting with the BBC, working for The Observer and The Daily Telegraph, he joined the EEC, became a press officer in Brussels and the press officer in Washington. It was a job that suited his talents admirably. Humourous, articulate, perspicacious, it seemed to be the perfect match for his bilingual talents.

All of us have a certain dichotomy in our personalities. As comedians, we want to play Hamlet. As Shakespeareans, we aspire to Morecambe and Wise. Andy, above all else, wanted to be a successful entrepreneur. He worked at the rockface of enterprise for the last ten years of his life, and failed to get his great dream of a transcontinental television company under way. He was so near it at the end that one can only conjure at the might-have-beens.

In all of this, he retained his remarkable calm, unsinkability and boundless optimism in the future. The voice would come on the phone, "AJ," it would say, "I have this wonderful idea."

There is almost nobody that I have ever played with or been associated with in the game of rugby football, that more epitomised what the game was about. He had a reverence and a knowledge for rugby that was encyclopaedic. As a young man, he had a photograph of Jack Kyle and his great outrider, Jim McCarthy, on the walls of his room at Gresham School. To be scrumhalf in later life to Kyle and to his other great hero, Cliff Morgan, was, to him, an honour and a privilege.

His combination with JP Horrocks-Taylor and the great Arthur Smith on the wing at Cambridge was for the memory book, and Andy was the scrumhalf for Ireland against England at Twickenham when Mick English, in explaining a missed tackle on Horrocks-Taylor, made the legendary remark, "Horrocks went one way, Taylor went the other, and I was left clutching his hyphen."

In the game of life, we meet many and varied people. They have their good points and their bad points. Most intend to be good and to be liked. If these be the criteria for a life well lived, then Andy was the Rupert Brooke of his generation a fair-haired beacon, a lover of life and poetry and art, with a slightly insouciant air of optimism and a penchant for friendship and for generosity.

Writing on Sir Donald Bradman, the late R C Robertson-Glasgow once observed that Bradman had both poetry and murder in his heart. For Andrew, the game was only about poetry. It was the rhythm of his life. It will be the recollection of his friends.

William Butler Yeats perhaps had Andrew in mind when he wrote the graceful words:

Think where man's glory most begins and ends,

And say my glory was I had such friends.

http://www.unison.ie/irish_independent/ ... ue_id=4027


New Zealand 6-9 British Isles

Eden Park , Auckland

9 September 1959
New Zealand : Pens: D Clarke (2)
British Isles : Tries: Jackson, O'Reilly, Risman

The 1959 Lions were as popular in New Zealand as their 1950 predecessors, operating on the same philosophy of running every slice of possession that came their way.
They won hearts and try-scoring records, but found themselves going the same way as all other Lions in the Tests, never more cruelly than when six Don Clarke penalties beat their four tries in the first international.
Ronnie Dawson's team got their reward, however, in the fourth Test, when they became the first - and to this day, the only - Lions to win a final Test in New Zealand, and did so by three tries to two penalties, both scored by Clarke, of course.
Ironically, the Lions put boot to ball more often than at almost any other stage of the tour, but they came alive after a forgettable first half-hour that ended with Clarke kicking New Zealand three points in front.
Appropriately, it was the tour's top try scorers, Tony O'Reilly and Peter Jackson, who sparked things off by combining for a sensational score.
O'Reilly swung in from the blindside flank and flung a one-handed pass out to Jackson, who danced past the three defenders blocking his path to the line.
Early in the second half, it was O'Reilly's turn. Scrum-half Andy Mulligan broke blind from a scrum and drew the New Zealand defence before slipping the ball to his Ireland colleague, thundering up at full steam. Contrasting style to Jackson , but exactly the same result.
However, the spectre of Clarke soon loomed again as he levelled with his second penalty, only for stand-off Bev Risman to settle the contest with a try from 40 yards worthy of winning any match.
A reverse pass from Mulligan threw almost the entire home defence and Risman then sidestepped the final defender before diving for the line to evade Clarke's covering dash.
The ultimate tribute to the Lions' verve and adventure came not from the scoreboard but from the Eden Park terraces, which resonated to the chant of "Red! Red!" throughout the second half as the tourists roared to victory.

New Zealand: DB Clarke; BE McPhail, TR Lineen, RW Caulton; AH Clarke, JF McCullough; RJ Urbahn; RJ Conway; EAR Pickering, SF Hill, CE Meads, KR Tremain; WJ Whineray (capt), RC Hemi, MW Irwin.

British Isles: TJ Davies; PB Jackson, D Hewitt, KJF Scotland, AJF O'Reilly; ABW Risman, AA Mulligan; HF McLeod, AR Dawson (capt), TR Prosser, RH Williams, WA Mulcahy, NAA Murphy, HJ Morgan, J Faull.
http://www.lionsrugby.com/feature1.html
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by PaulHP on Wed Mar 29, 2006 2:10 pm

2 late members of the 1948 Ireland Squad:

Desmond Joesph O'Brien

Born: 22nd May 1919 Dublin
Died: 26th Decemeber 2005 Lasswade, Scotland

Image
Des O'Brien (wearing the headgear) Ireland v Wales 1948

Irish legend O'Brien dies

Thursday December 29 2005

Grand Slammer of 1948

Des O'Brien, one of the legends of Irish rugby, died in his home in Lasswade, Midlothian, Scotland on Boxing Day. He was 86.
When John Scally wrote his book The Giants of Irish Rugby in 1996, O'Brien was one of the 40. His chapter was headed The Leader of the Pack.

O'Brien was a loose forward and played 20 times for Ireland between 1948 and 1952. He was never dropped.

The year 1948 was a significant year in Ireland's rugby history for that year the men in emerald green won the Grand Slam, never to be repeated it seems. He made his debut at Twickenham that year when Ireland beat England 11-10. They then beat France on Paris 13-6, Scotland 6-0 at Lansdowne Road and Wales 6-3 at Ravenhill. It was the first time Ireland had won the Triple Crown since 1899 and the only time they won the Grand Slam.

In 1952 O'Brien captained Ireland on a eight-match tour to Argentina. They played twice against Argentina - drawing 3-all and winning 6-0 - but did not give caps for the matches. That was in August-September 1952, his Irish swan song.

At this time Ireland had a great pack and he was its leader. They scrummed particularly well and employed the wheel and dribbling to good effect. Behind the pack they had the genius of Jackie Kyle.

He also attributed the success to the fitness of the players, as Scally records him saying: "in the five years I played for Ireland nobody had a wife or a motor car. We either walked or cycled. This gave us a natural fitness which the players don't have today. I know this may sound like boasting but I think we were the fittest back row that ever played for Ireland. Jim McCarthy in particular had exceptional fitness. Our other colleague in the back row, Bill McKay, was a 400 yards sprinting champion and a boxing champion. The three of us played together 14 times for Ireland and lost only three games."

He captained Ireland five times - against South Africa in 1951 and then against France, Scotland, Wales and Ireland in 1952. At that time he was playing in Cardiff.

In his invitation to play against South Africa in 1951, his first match as captain, he was told: "Your jersey will be supplied, and must be returned immediately at the conclusion of the game, otherwise a charge of 25/- will be made."

The players were not given socks as they played in their club socks.
Though he lived in and played for Cardiff, there was no hotel accommodation for him in Dublin for his mother lived in the city and he was expected to stay with her.

Terry Godwin in his book The International Rugby Championship writes of O'Brien's last match: "It was also the nineteenth and last Championship appearance of Des O'Brien, who added a new dimension to Irish back-row play with his ball skill, distribution and speed in the loose. His leadership by example was badly missed by Ireland, who went downhill rapidly from 1952."

In his career, apart from Ireland, he played for Belvedere College, Cardiff, Edinburgh University, London Irish, Old Belvedere, Wasps and the Barbarians.

In 1966 O'Brien was the manager of the Lions on their tour to Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

After his playing career, the Guinness rep took a master's degree in architecture and settle din Edinburgh.

It was not just rugby that was his sport. He played squash 14 times for Ireland, was disappointed that he had not tried to qualify for Wimbledon, and played hockey for Wales.

Desmond Joseph O'Brien was born in Dublin on 22 May 1919. He was educated at Belvedere College and the University of Edinburgh. He died in Edinburgh on 26 December 2005.

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Ireland team departing Dublin for Twickenham 1948. Des O'Brien wearing light coloured coat(standing 4 from left) & Chris Daly (standing right) long grey coat

John Christopher (Chris) Daly

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1947 before match versus England

DOB: 12th December 1917 Cobh
Died: 10th October 1988 Chertsey

Capped 7 times for Ireland 1947-8
Barbarian 4 appearences 1947-8

Prop forward who scored the winning try against Wales at Ravenhill in 1948 to win Ireland the Triple Crown. Daly's jersey was torn off his back as a souvenir, one Corkman was heard to say of him 'There is only one thing left to do. We must canonise him!'
The winning try came in the second half Des O'Brien and Chris Daly broke from a maul with the ball at their feet. They dribbled expertly for 30 yards to the Welsh line and then, controlling it magnificently they resisted all Welsh efforts to stopthe onward progress. It went over the Welsh line and Daly grabbed it to touch down with a resounding thud.

Served with the London Irish Rifles during WWII.

After the 1948 success Daly turned to rugby league accepting a £1,000 offer from Huddersfield, with a match appearance fee of £8, £9 for a draw and £12 for a win. The 1948-49 side won the championship play-off at Manchester City F.C.'s Maine Road ground on Saturday May 14th 1949. Huddersfield beat Warrington in an exciting match watched by a then world record crowd for a rugby league match of 75,194 in a season which netted them the Yorkshire League Cup and the Northern League Cup. He helped Huddersfield to win the championship in 1949 and the Yorkshire League in 1949 and 1950. After 83 games for Huddersfield he moved to Featherstone Rovers in 1951 and appeared in the Rovers team, which reached Wembley for the first time in 1952 only to lose to Workington Town in a splendid Challenge Cup Final. Jack won seven caps for other nationalities and retired in 1953.
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by PaulHP on Sat Apr 01, 2006 9:23 pm

Anthony Simonds-Gooding

Played Hooker in the early 1960's. Was awarded the Forwards Honours Tie whilst playing for the Wild Geese at the end of the 1961/62 season.

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Currently Chairman of DBA (Design Business Association)http://www.dba.org.uk/ and D&AD (an educational charity who's purpose is to set creative standards, educate, inspire and promote good design and advertising) http://www.dandad.org/about/what-we-do.html

http://www.omg3d.com/html/11%7Ecompany.html
Anthony Simonds-Gooding
Non-Executive Chairman

Anthony Simonds-Gooding joined the Board as non-executive Director in April 2002 and became non-executive Chairman in December 2002. He has an extensive career in marketing, advertising, and management including the posts of Chief Executive with Whitbread, Saatchi & Saatchi, and British Satellite Broadcasting. He is currently Chairman of the Design and Art Directors' Association and has acted as non-executive director to over a dozen companies and charitable trusts, including currently Blick, Kunick, Lorica, Community Hospitals Trust, Macmillan Cancer Relief, and the Rainbow Trust.




NEW GIFTS FOR HAT (History of Advertising Trust) ARCHIVE
BSB's guardbooks
Anthony Simonds-Gooding, Chairman of D&AD and former Chief Executive of British Satellite Broadcasting, which merged with Sky In 1991, has donated BSB's guard books to HAT Archive. BSB's history though quite brief, is most important in the annals of UK television history.
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by Mrs Chicken on Sun Apr 02, 2006 12:36 am

This is such a fantastic thread that I feel churlish throwing up a negative comment. But it's only a minor one.

I don't think the picture of Tabai Matson is actually Tabai Matson!

Otherwise, I have to say I'm gobsmacked by the amount of effort which must have gone into compiling this information. Well done Paul and DP. More please!
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by dom_pedro on Sun Apr 02, 2006 7:42 am

Hmmm, could be right!

Here's a 99 pic next to the one from the Japanese team site.
Image Image

:shock: That's not the picture I had found originally!!!

They've mucked about with their site. Here's the proper pic.

Image from http://www.yamaha-motor.co.jp/rugby/players/matson/

and here's a video of him saying something or other in Japanese.

http://www.yamaha-motor.co.jp/rugby/pla ... on_320.wmv
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by PaulHP on Sat Apr 08, 2006 10:55 pm

Gavin Hickie

Hickie made two appearances for London Irish's "A" side before forcing his way onto the bench for the Exiles' 25-23 Premiership defeat at Northampton last month. He failed, however, to earn any game-time as former Ireland Under-21 international Adrian Flavin played the full 80 minutes at Franklin's Gardens.


Tigers plunder Worcester hooker 21/03/06
Gavin Hickie signs for Leicester
Leicester have signed Irish hooker Gavin Hickie from Worcester on a two-year contract.

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Gavin Hickie: Leicester's new hooker
Hickie, 25, represented Ireland A in 2002 and hopes a move to Welford Road this summer will re-ignite his international ambitions.

"I'm thrilled to get this chance," said Hickie.

"The opportunity to be part of the set-up at Leicester was too good to turn down. But I'm very sad to be leaving Worcester. I didn't know anybody when I went there and I've fallen in love with the place.

"That made it a tough decision to make, but you can't refuse when Leicester come calling. Playing for Leicester will present a lot more opportunities in big games next season.

"I played for Leinster when they won the Celtic Cup and played in Heineken Cup matches for them as well. I want to add to that experience now and take my career onto the next level."

Hickie faces stiff competition at Leicester with England squad member George Chuter and James Buckland already at the club.

But Leicester's forwards coach Richard Cockerill is confident Hickie will make an immediate impact.

"He is still young at 25 years old and has a very good pedigree. He has represented Ireland A and made nearly 50 appearances for Leinster in the Heineken Cup and Celtic League," said Cockerill.

"He is a quality signing for us and will bring considerable competition for the number two shirt. His real strengths are that he is a good ball carrier and brings physicality and an excellent attitude to the game."

Hickie joined Worcester from Leinster but has played just seven Guinness Premiership matches and one in the Powergen Cup.

http://www.rugbyrugby.com/news/story_49820.shtml
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by dom_pedro on Sun Apr 09, 2006 7:52 pm

The list was here - and now it isn't. Might give it a new thread.
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by dom_pedro on Thu Apr 13, 2006 9:16 pm

Image

Paul Franze has now moved on to Castleford Tigers. Castleford Tigers site news - he's in with a chance of playing against Wakefield tomorrow.
This cruel country has driven me down, teased me and lied.
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by Mrs Chicken on Thu Apr 13, 2006 9:39 pm

This old broiler would like to say thanks (again) to both Paul and Dom_P for the work they've put into this thread.

Entertaining, informative, well researched and any other number of superlatives you care to use.

Thanks, you two. Much appreciated.
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by Huck the hooker on Thu Apr 13, 2006 9:53 pm

This is the first time I've looked at this thread, very good stuff and a potted history. Well worth linking to other friendly sites!
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by dom_pedro on Thu Apr 20, 2006 10:01 pm

While looking some stuff up for the Old Boys list I came across an almost old boy and I'd forgotten all about this 'episode'. In February 2002 Rassie Erasmus was announced as having signed for Irish (Erasmus signs) and would be joining for the next season. A week before the Powergen cup final, it was announced that actually no he wasn't coming (Erasmus turns his back on Irish). I wonder whether that piece of silverware made us (or at least me) forget about it.
This cruel country has driven me down, teased me and lied.
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by dom_pedro on Mon Apr 24, 2006 3:39 pm

Just read on the Craic that Paul Franze is now taking a break from rugby having cancelled his contract with the Castleford Tigers.
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by PaulHP on Tue May 02, 2006 12:02 pm

George Puil

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Awarded the London Irish Backs Honours tie for 1953-4 season. Canadian International.

George Puil of Vancouver was a high school teacher for 35 years and a Vancouver city councillor for 28 years after having served on the Vancouver Parks Board for 12 years. He also chaired the Greater Vancouver Regional District for six years and was the founding chair of the Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority - TransLink.

He has served as chair of dozens of regional and national committees. He was named Transit Advocate of the Year by the Canadian Urban Transit Association (2002) and received the UBC Alumni Award of Distinction (2000). Mr. Puil also received The Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal. He holds a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Education from the University of British Columbia.

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One of UBC's outstanding two-way football and rugby players of the early '50s was a league All-Star in football and an All-Star at the university, provincial and national levels in rugby. For 10 years, represented BC and Canada internationally in rugby.
http://www.ubcsportshalloffame.com/cgi- ... earchall=1
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by PaulHP on Tue May 02, 2006 1:24 pm

Robin Henderson Thompson
Captain of the 1955 British and Irish Lions and Ireland.

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Born: 05 May 1931, Belfast. Died: 14 August 2003, Belfast.

Capped 11 times for Ireland in the 1950’s, he captained the Lions to a 2-2 draw in the series against the Springboks after having won the two opening Tests. He played in 3 of the tests, and had his appendix removed whilst on tour.

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Robin Thompson 1955 Lions Squad

He played for RBAI (Royal Belfast Academical Institution), Ulster Schools, Queen’s University, Ulster, Instonians, Barbarians, as well as London Irish. He was a chemistry graduate from Queen's University Belfast.

A year after the Lions tour, the Queen's University graduate caused a sensation by signing for Rugby League club Warrington. He was a civil servant working in Nottingham, the Chairman of Warrington (owner of a large chemical plant) offered him a job with his company and he signed on for £4,000. He earned £8 for a win, £7 for a draw and £6 for losing.

However his League career proved shortlived because of Myelosclerosis a bone disease which forced him to give up the game aged 25. In 1957 he was given 3 years to live.

He returned to Ireland, and subsequently became a media analyst.

In 1970 he suffered the first of a number of heart attacks. But despite suffering from bouts of ill-health during the remainder of his life.

In 1982 he completed the Belfast marathon in a time of just over four hours.

In early 2003 he was inducted into the Irish Rugby Writers Hall of Fame.

Interview on BBC NI website from 2001(Pt 1): http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/norther ... 371506.stm

(Pt 2): http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/norther ... 388325.stm

Barbarian record:
http://www.barbarianfc.co.uk/new_search ... =1484#trie

International record:
http://statistics.scrum.com/rugby_stats_05.asp?ID=ITH5

1955 Lions:
http://www.lionsrugby.com/1955.htm
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by PaulHP on Sun May 07, 2006 11:39 am

Dr Kevin Patrick O’Flanagan

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Born: 10 June 1919, Dublin
Died: 26 May 2006, Dublin.

Dr Kevin O’Flanagan is one of a few people who have played International Rugby (1946-7) and Football for Ireland (between 1937-47) (his brother Michael was also capped for both). He also managed to play for London Irish and Arsenal on successive Saturdays. He also played for Bective Rangers and Bohemians.

He reputedly could play golf to a single-figure handicap both right and left-handed. He also played Tennis to a high standard and was an Irish track-and-field champion.

He was the Medical Officer and the President of the Olympic Council of Ireland. Between 1977 and 1999 he was on the International Olympic Committee, and was made an honorary life member of the International Olympic Committee.

International Rugby record: http://statistics.scrum.com/rugby_stats_05.asp?ID=IOY21


http://www.olympic.org/uk/organisation/ ... asp?id=144

http://www.olympicsport.ie/members.html

http://www.olympicsport.ie/history5.html

http://www.kickinmagazine.ie/internatio ... norway.htm

http://jkarlsson.netfirms.com/players/o/oflanagan_kp/
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by PaulHP on Sun May 07, 2006 10:24 pm

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